Review: World Premiere of VIVIAN Shows Huge Potential for Future Productions

How does a family move on from the loss of a wife and mother? It’s a difficult question in the first place, then you throw in a haunted house, and the whole situation gets jumbled.

So begins Vivian, a new musical by Atlanta theatre professionals Chase Peacock and Jessica de Maria. Making its world premiere at the intimate Lyric Studio Stage (one of a zillion theatres on the Marietta Square), the audience is tightly packed in, inches from the action- the pre-show curtain speech requests no one leave their seat until the end of the show for their own safety.

It’s worth noting that this particular crowd- largely composed of friends of the writers and performers- seemed unfazed by the spooky elements. Unexpected ghost appearances, sudden shocking moments, almost all were greeted with laughter from this congenial, if relaxed group. You’ve never seen an audience more ready to fall in love with a new work.

Vivian tells the story of therapist Cliff Bennett (a rich Travis Smith) who, having recently lost his wife, moves with his two daughters to a disheveled fixer-upper home. Reading patients and reaching his own daughters prove two very different things, with the latter being the chief struggle Dr. Bennett- who repeatedly reminds us of his prestigious title- faces. As they settle in, his youngest child, Vivian (a young and brilliant Mabel Tyler), seems haunted by an invisible force in the house. Teenaged Chrissy (a poignant Brittany Ellis), meanwhile, is so over both her dad’s lame attempts at connecting with her, and the boy-next-door’s, James (a golden-voiced Austin Taylor), attempts to woo her. As a first mounting, the 90-minute one-act musical leaves much to be desired while showing great promise.

It feels like two shows in one: the first being a sad but hopeful musical about a family trying to rebuild their life, a man struggling to love his daughters well, and a teenager falling in love. The second, a straight play without songs, is a ghost story about a girl sporadically possessed by something unknown. Each entity is intriguing and worth pursuit, though neither is fully fleshed-out. As a unit, Vivian plays as simultaneous productions of both the musical and the straight play performed in tandem unbeknownst to one another. This ultimately creates an unfinished product in search of a focal point as it flails in different directions.

Chase and Jessica’s modern ballads sit comfortably in the Broadway-pop genre, with an easy rock bent. Especially in “The Tides,” a masterful trio sung by Dr. Bennett and his daughters, C&J’s songs feature utterly delightful folk-like harmonies. Much of the music and lyrics prove memorable in the best ways, with another particular winner, the sweetly relatable “Let Me Guess.” Still, the show feels under-sung, with little variety in the tunes, which often trail off without closure, and have a weak connection to the book.

Its billing as a ghost story hypes the supernatural elements more than the story delivers, with some explanations turning out to be disappointingly benign. Even at the close of the show, it’s unclear whether the ghost(s) are malicious or just creepy by virtue of being ghosts.

A few key moments are lost in Vivian’s underdeveloped book. Without giving anything away, the audience reaches some conclusions while the characters are still in the dark. Then suddenly, we’re all on the same page, not quite sure how or when the Bennetts and co. got there. Among its many fragmented pursuits, the most disjointing is the show’s abrupt, songless end. Even the actors seemed apologetic as they shrugged, smirked as if to say, “Yes, that’s really it,” and bowed.

Director Julie Skrzypek uses every inch of the limiting venue, with a simple if predictable set. As a small-scale world premiere, this production does exactly what it needs to: it shows the vast potential in this musical and its writers.

(Dis)Agree with what you read? Let’s have a discussion in the comments or on Twitter- @BwayGinger!

Oh and let’s just all listen to “The Tides” and “Let Me Guess” on repeat, ok? And then check out more at Chase and Jessica’s website, here.

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Top 5 Performances to Catch in Atlanta This Fall

In a city now full of pumpkin spice lattes, hay rides, and flannels, local theatres are bringing their Halloween A-game to round out this fall in Atlanta. From immersive outdoor experiences to Hitchcock classics, our Atlanta theatre fam has it all!

But how to choose which shows to attend? Check out BroadwayGinger’s top five spooky theatre picks!

Photo Flash: Aurora Theatre to Stage Crucible Sequel ABIGAIL/1702

Abigail/1702 at Aurora Theatre

When: Now through October 15

Elevator pitch: Diany Rodriguez is the bomb.com under normal circumstances, but in this show, she’s non-stop, taking her talent to the next level.

But really, why fight Atlanta traffic? The Devil. Flashbacks. The scariest surprise goat of all time. This one-act sequel to Arthur Miller’s The Crucible is as thought-provoking as it is terrifying.

Get those tickets!

Check it out! Interview: Diany Rodriguez Humanizes a Familiar Antagonist in ABIGAIL/1702 at Aurora Theatre

Vivian at the Lyric (Studio Theatre in the Square)

When: October 11-14

Elevator pitch: A brand new musical premiering right in Atlanta? Sounds like we Atlanta theatre nerds will get bragging rights for dayyyyys!

But really, why fight Atlanta traffic? The Lyric’s studio space creates an intimate experience perfect for a spooky musical. Written by our own local theatre artists Chase Peacock and Jessica De Maria, this mysterious ghost story promises its fair share of intrigue.

Get those tickets!

Click here to check out BroadwayGinger’s review of Vivian!

The Sleepy Hollow Experience at Serenbe Playhouse

When: Now through November 5

Elevator pitch: What’s scarier than a Halloween show? A Halloween experience in the woods.

But really, why fight Atlanta traffic? Serenbe can do no wrong. Their consistently inventive work never fails to expand the bounds of what’s possible in the theatre world. So now bringing a new adaptation of their annual Sleepy Hollow Experience,

Get those tickets!

DIAL M FOR MURDER

Dial M for Murder at Stage Door Players

When: Now through October 15

Elevator pitch: As a rule, I’m on board with anything involving the phrase “perfect murder” and “Hitchcockian.”

But really, why fight Atlanta traffic? No Halloween season is complete with out a good, old-fashioned murder mystery. Even those of us who haven’t seen the 1954 Alfred Hitchcock movie of the same name know Stage Door’s show is bound to include twists and turns and unexpected gasp/scream/jump/grab the arm of the stranger next to you moments.

Get those tickets!

Sense and Sensibility at Synchronicity (say that five times fast)

When: Now through October 15

Elevator pitch:  Ok, so it’s not spooky. But I mean, Jane Freaking Austen. Need I say more?

But really, why fight Atlanta traffic? I like to call Synchronicity a hidden gem of Atlanta theatre. Housed in a shared space, they aren’t the most conspicuous venue in our city, but I completely trust their play choices and execution of them. I have yet to be disappointed by a work there.

Get those tickets!

 

 

Interview: Diany Rodriguez Humanizes a Familiar Antagonist in ABIGAIL/1702 at Aurora Theatre

Can a liar be redeemed?

Aurora Theatre’s newest mainstage endeavor, Abigail/1702 revisits Arthur Miller’s The Crucible ten years after the Salem Witch Trials. Though, to go as far as calling this a sequel may be a misnomer.

“It’s kind of its own unique story,” shares actress Diany Rodriguez, starring as the title role through October 17. “Both [The Crucible and Abigail/1702] are works of fiction, although they’re based in realistic events. Abigail is what might have happened if these characters, as written, continued to live ten years later.”

In Abigail/1702, the finger-pointing girl whom fans of The Crucible have a special hatred for, Abigail Williams now leads an altruistic, secluded life in Boston. Haunted by her past in Salem when her knowingly false accusations about witchcraft in the town sent many innocent people to hang, this play sees Abigail piling on good deeds to make up for her sordid background. Using Miller’s characters, playwright Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa asks enough questions to turn the story on its head.

“If you go into this thinking, ‘Okay, if the devil exists, and if the devil made Abigail do it, but the onus is on Abigail to have said “No,”’ then what is it in Abigail’s character or her circumstance that made her think this was the best way?  If there is a devil, and if she wanted to make a contract with him, why?  Is it because she wants power?  Is it because she inherently loves the feeling that making a contract with the devil gives her?” Photo Flash: Aurora Theatre to Stage Crucible Sequel ABIGAIL/1702

Rodriguez says the Devil himself very much plays a part in this story, though what exactly, she won’t say. “In Abigail, there’s more of an investigation over whether Abigail did have a contract with an actual devil that actually guided her to make some of the allegations that she did, or whether it was just her way to camouflage her own actions and her own need to serve herself and be a guide for her own survival.”

In addition to asking questions of Abigail’s character, this piece also explores the idea of redemption in a powerful way. “This is a whole fictionalized version of her story and telling what happens when our deeds have actual real-life consequences. Can we be redeemed after we’ve done so much to our detriment and- for Abigail- to the detriment of at least twenty others whom she sent to their death and the lives of the people who loved the people whom she sent to their death?”

Despite her character’s past, Rodriguez can empathize with her, pointing out how she was not set up for success from the beginning of The Crucible.

abigail at aurora

“It’s easy for me already to take her side because I do see her as a victim of her circumstance. Hey, she is wholly flawed.  Don’t get me wrong! But she also could have used help. There is a lot of potential thinking that her Uncle Parris abused her, so there’s a lot to be said for her circumstances and how she might have not even been in a great place to make decisions [in The Crucible], even had she not had a sexual affair with a much older man who happened to be married and have two children.”

Besides Abigail, which familiar characters from The Crucible will we see? That’s part of the surprise too.

“There are characters in Abigail that are very much central characters in The Crucible, and they are only billed as, ‘Young Man,’ ‘Young Woman,’ ‘Older Woman,’ ‘Older Man,’ and like ‘Young Child,'” she explains. “Even small characters in The Crucible that had some sort of impact on her appear in Abigail. And that’s about as much as I can say without giving it away!”

However, she did reveal that the audience will get some closure on pieces that Arthur Miller left hanging. “There is a scene where my stage manager said at one point, ‘I hope the audience gets on their feet and claps, because this is a moment we’ve wanted to see since The Crucible.’”

After Abigail/1702, Rodriguez will be switching gears to appear in the fun, family-centered Stone Mountain Christmas, and then The Followers at Seven Stages Theatre. But right now, this actress continues to share her contagious passion for both the multifaceted role of Abigail Williams and the show itself.

“Theatre is supposed to either let you escape or be a mirror to humanity or let you get in touch with your empathy or let you think really hard. Abigail/1702 is really beautiful, scary, and thought-provoking.”


Abigail/1702 runs on Aurora Theatre’s mainstage through October 17. Click here to purchase tickets!

 Diany Rodriguez:
Notable Atlanta Credits: Significant OtherInformed ConsentHands on a Hardbody, HomersBull Durham: The MusicalRocky Horror ShowIn Love and Warcraft, Zorro: The Musical, Into the Woods (X2), The Fairytale Lives of Russian Girls, and August: Osage County. Notable regional credits: Carrie: A Comedy (Sue), Marvelous Wonderettes (Suzy), Fame (Carmen). Tours: Rent (Mark’s Mom/US Mimi), Dora the Explorer (Dora). Off-B’way: Soul Kitchen (Sangita), Shlomo (Anjia/Ruth). Film/TV: Pepper’s Place (pilot),The Yellow Birds, Survivor’s Remorse. Up Next: Christmas Canteen at Aurora Theatre and Exit Strategy at True Colors Theatre. Thank you, people I love; I love you.

THE KING AND I: 101 Reasons to Bring Back Poofy Skirts

Why did we ever do away with hoop skirts and ballrooms? Whoever made that decision didn’t ask me. But this week, Broadway in Atlanta takes us back to such a time with the lavish tour of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s classic, The King and I.

Making a stop at Atlanta’s own Fabulous Fox Theatre this week as part of its nationwide tour, the Lincoln Center Theater’s musical revival won four 2015 Tony Awards, including the much-awaited Best Actress for Broadway favorite Kelli O’Hara. The classic score continues to enchant audiences, with well-known favorites like “Getting to Know You,” “I Whistle a Happy Tune,” and my personal swoon favorites, “Something Wonderful” and “I Have Dreamed.”

Below, let’s take a first look at the beautiful musical!

About this production:
Director Bartlett Sher is reunited with the award-winning creative team from South Pacific and The Light in the Piazza. The King and I features sets by Michael Yeargan; costumes by Catherine Zuber; lighting by Donald Holder, sound by Scott Lehrer and choreography by Christopher Gattelli based on the original choreography by Jerome Robbins.

Set in 1860’s Bangkok, the musical tells the story of the unconventional and tempestuous relationship that develops between the King of Siam and Anna Leonowens, a British schoolteacher whom the modernist King, in an imperialistic world, brings to Siam to teach his many wives and children.

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Joan Almedilla as Tuptim. QUEEN. (not literally, but like… she’s got a voice of gold)
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Hoops for DAAAAAYYYYSSS, feat. Jose Llana (the King) and Laura Michelle Kelly (and I)
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Jose Llana
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Laura Michelle Kelly and Jose Llana in the most iconic The King and I pose.
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“You are precisely my cup of tea” – Laura Michelle Kelly as Anna
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Can I have her dress and gloves? Please and thank you. (Laura Michelle Kelly)
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Laura Michelle Kelly, Baylen Thomas, Graham Montgomery in Titanic the Musical The King and I
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Young lovers Manna Nichols and Kevin Panmeechao kiss in a shadow
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Gold!!

If this doesn’t convince you to return to the days of elaborate fabrics and the poofiest (and totally extra, let’s be honest) of skirts, I don’t know what will.

The King and I runs right here in Atlanta at our Fabulous Fox Theatre through October 1. Click here for tickets.

Photo credits: Matthew Murphy

Review: Aurora’s BURNPILE Tugs on Atlanta Heartstrings

It’s a sinister-looking poster, right? That title combined with the visual of a woman holding a match and a mischievous look on her face that says, “Just dare me not to do it”-honestly, I thought I was walking into a tragedy. But Aurora’s nostalgic Throw me on the Burnpile and Light me Up is anything but sinister in this one-woman production starring Taylor M. Dooley.

The summary on the flier hardly does it justice. This piece sees Boss recalling memories from a solid year or so of elementary school in rural Georgia. Delivered as though every memory happened yesterday, Dooley embodies a 3rd/4th-grader as she tells anecdote after anecdote about her life. “Boss” (as her father calls her) is the daughter of a pro bono lawyer who defends criminals most of the judgmental folks in the town would call scumbags. He uses his cases as a way to gently educate her, particularly in his philosophy, which she repeatedly parrots, “Everyone deserves a defender.”

Very reminiscent of To Kill a Mockingbird, Boss recalls events in her life as nothing special, not realizing in her innocence that bringing Sam Cook tapes to murderers in jail isn’t exactly a regular part of most childhoods. She refers to the cases and clients as “ours”- hers and her daddy’s. It’s a sweet touch. In her wide-eyed desire to help her hero, her father, Boss genuinely sees herself as part of the defense team. The way she tells it, she is indispensable.

As fits the backdrop motif to the story, the burnpile- a collection of belongings of Boss and her father’s clients who died on death row- very literally serves as the backdrop in the play. Stacked high upstage, it visibly includes items she mentions in her stories. Kudos to the design team for that noticeable detail. From all these objects, the faux monkey grass bordering the stage, and the candles she lights before every new scene, some combination thereof created a musty, summery scent. This olfactory touch puts the audience right in Boss’s backyard as she paces around and tells us about her life.

From the moment she first addresses the audience, Dooley makes an individual connection with everyone as if each audience member is her best friend. Maybe not a feat for intense memories, but she keeps the connection throughout the entirety of the show. Her engaging eye contact, active childlike demeanor, and her impeccable impersonations of every person in her life bring an urgency to her serious stories, but keep the audience actively engaged even in the silly, childlike stories.

She solidifies this connection by breaking the fourth wall in her pauses for laughter, directing the next line at people laughing the loudest, adding a smooth, “Yeah, and you won’t believe what happened next…” effect. At first glance it seems that Dooley’s friends must all be on the front rows. But they aren’t. Boss’s are.

The lighting stands out as a significant piece of the story’s tapestry, creating a marvelous car headlights look at one detailed moment, and throughout the piece, distinctly changing for emphasis. In the first half, Dooley sporadically transforms into adult Boss to tell some portions of stories, with lighting playing a large part in her transformation. Quite an intriguing choice, though it ultimately proves confusing due to its inconsistency and ultimate discontinuation.

The depiction of Boss and her father and the way Dooley brings it to life make this one-woman show a winner. I kept apprehensively waiting for the moment she would die, or her father would suddenly do something horrible to taint her childlike hero worship of him. But neither happens. It’s just a sweet, meaningful look at two formative years in the life of a child in an adult world, dealing optimistically with harsh realities, not knowing hers is anything but a normal childhood.

Photo Flash: First Look at THROW ME ON THE BURNPILE AND LIGHT ME UP at Aurora Theatre

Top 10 Reasons to Drop Everything and see HUNCHBACK at Aurora/Theatrical Outfit Yesterday

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Got any plans this weekend? Perfect. Go see a musical. And make it The Hunchback of Notre Dame at the Aurora Theatre in Lawrenceville.

Aurora and Theatrical Outfit’s joint production of the musical adaptation of The Hunchback of Notre Dame based on the songs from the Disney movie and classic Victor Hugo novel of the same name opened mid-July at Aurora and will transfer to the Rialto Center for the Arts in September. It’s beautiful. It’s dark. It’s perfection. Despite its “Disney” tag, there’s nothing fluffy Disney or kid-friendly about this wonderful musical. At its core, it is a true adaptation of Hugo’s book, representing harsh realities of living in a broken world.

Whatever you do, don’t miss The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and here is why.

1. It’s basically the movie on steroids.

The Hunchback movie has always disappointed me. It brought us some of Alan Menken’s very best music coupled with a genre-ambiguous story that sits homeless between depressing and happy ending-driven. The songs were fantastic, eagerly awaiting an expanded score and overhauled book. Enter the 2014 stage adaptation at La Jolla Playhouse. With a book by Peter Parnell and about a zillion extra songs by Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz, this new Hunchback ditches the wishy-washy attempt at child appeal and leans boldly into a genuine take on this dark, sad story. More songs. More backstory. Richer plot. Huge kudos to Aurora/Theatrical Outfit for choosing a rock solid musical.

2. “Top of the World,” “In a Place of Miracles,” and many more new tunes. 

The 10+ added songs- many more if you count the frequent Latin choir background- bring a fresh wholeness to the score. Like Disney’s good stage musicals, the extra tunes give audiences a new favorite song from a musical they thought they knew so well. You’ll leave the theatre with “Top of the World” in your head and really might cry over “In a Place of Miracles.”

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3. That set though!

For those who watched the La Jolla production, Aurora’s set will look familiar. Designed by Shannon Robert, the whole stage is the interior of Notre Dame itself, complete with a painted floor and stone statues of saints (don’t worry- I hate myself for that alliteration as much as you do). But better than La Jolla’s, Robert ingeniously depicts Quasimodo “gazing at the people down below” by using a freestanding staircase that easily swivels about the stage. With no suspension of disbelief, the audience often sees Quasi high atop a church tower overlooking Paris, especially effective in “Out There” and “Top of the World.” As an added bonus, nostalgic Disney fans get to see this Quasi perform his signature parapet slide which, as ’90s Disney VHS tapes remind us, appeared in every preview for Hunchback ever.

4. Themes on themes on themes.

Hunchback is largely plot-driven, taking the audience through a neverending sea of emotions. These are evoked through the inventive direction of Justin Anderson as he pulls out many poignant themes, including the comparison between Quasimodo and his stone gargoyle friends (virtually unexplored in the La Jolla premiere), the power of those who are physically weak but emotionally strong, and of course the line that appears in both the first and final song, “What makes a monster, and what makes a man?”

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5. The hardest-working ensemble in the world.

You’d think there were 40 people in that cast. Throughout the whole show, the ensemble is ubiquitous- on stage as characters, off-stage singing in Latin as a church choir, sometimes townspeople, sometimes gypsies. Oh and sometimes gargoyle puppeteers. Discussing what a tragedy it is that Hunchback has yet to premiere on Broadway, one cast member jokingly told me, “Well I can see why! Who wants to do all this eight times a week for months? It’s exhausting!”

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6. Oh hey Lowery Brown, where have you been all my life?

As captain of the guard, Phoebus, Lowery Brown comes close to stealing the whole show. His stirring vocals particularly during “Finale” coupled with his commanding presence secure him in the ranks of Atlanta’s best. It begs the question- where have I been, that this is the first time I’ve seen this incredible talent in action?

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7. Puppets.

I’d love to have been a fly on the wall for the moment the creators of the La Jolla production decided how to handle the gargoyles. My best guess is they shrugged and said, “Meh, let’s just throw some people in grey robes and call it a day.” Were they gargoyles? Were they just saints? Lol honestly, who knows. Aurora/Theatrical Outfit’s production looks the issue square in the face and solves it. With puppets. This design is strongest during “Made of Stone,” as Quasimodo has all but lost hope. One by one, the puppeteers lay down their puppets, showing a harsh comparison between the gargoyles’ immobility and Quasimodo’s defeatism.

8. The unstoppable choreography of Ricardo Aponte.

Oh y’all, Hunchback sees Ricardo Aponte’s choreography at its finest. Composed mostly of songs sprinkled with dialogue- think The Phantom of the Opera, but shorter and with an actual plot- Aponte was busy. His stellar melding of various dance syles drives home the idea that the outcast gypsies are a melting pot of nomads from many cultures. His work brilliantly enhances the story rather than merely making a pretty spectacle to look at. The characters don’t just dance because it’s a moral imperative for musicals. They dance because that’s part of who their characters are, a rare approach that is refreshing to see right here in our city.

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9. Julissa Sabino, the only Esmeralda. 

You think you’ve seen Esmeralda, and then you see Julissa Sabino’s interpretation, and everything changes. She takes on the resilience for which the character is so well known, but she adds a distinctly feminine gentleness and quirky affectations that bring Esmeralda down from a macho, invincible gypsy to a woman who can admit her imperfections without letting them hinder her. She never sacrifices kindness for strength. Can we just go ahead and hand Sabino that Suzi Bass Award? Please and thank you.

Check out my conversation with Julissa from this summer!

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10. Haden Rider, my new favorite Quasimodo.

As Quasimodo, Rider tackles the interesting challenge of playing a man with a strong heart but a deformed, weak-looking body. With his whole being, he distinguishes so effectively the difference between the Quasimodo the world sees and the true Quasimodo in his head. We see him transform for the duration of his solos from a man with a physical impediment and raspy voice into a man with a strong posture and stunning voice. Rider’s tenor vocals are simply unmatched. He delivers “Out There” with ease, even with strep throat (as he told me was the case the first time I attended the show). Frankly, it’s an exhausting process to watch. And he does it magnificently.

You got your tickets yet?

In short, go see the show. As someone who has attended Atlanta theatre for years, I can firmly say this is the best local production I have ever seen. It’s a spectacular musical, and there could not possibly be a better version than Aurora/Theatrical Outfit’s.

Follow BwayGinger on Twitter for more Atlanta theatre news, reviews, and coffee shop live-tweets!

For more information and to purchase tickets, click here (Aurora Theatre) or here (Theatrical Outfit).

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Photo credits: Daniel Parvis

Julissa Sabino Talks Returning to IN THE HEIGHTS with Aurora’s Musicals by Moonlight Series

Displaying JulissaSabino_TheatricalHS2_AMT.jpgJoyful is the best way to describe Julissa Sabino.

With enough excitement to fuel all of Metro Atlanta, this diligent actress clearly possesses a contagious passion for her work and a relentless desire to continue stretching herself as a performer. In the interview below, she shares about the process involved in returning to the role of Vanessa in Aurora’s encore performance of IN THE HEIGHTS- previously featured on BroadwayGinger as one of Atlanta’s must-see shows of the summer– and how she is more than ready to dive back in and explore the character once again.

How has it been revisiting IN THE HEIGHTS?

I think it’s always great! I got to revisit TOXIC AVENGER before, and I’m revisiting IN THE HEIGHTS, so this is my second time revisiting a show, but this show in particular is so much about community and choosing the parts of your tradition you’re going to keep with you as you move on, and which parts you’re going to leave behind. Especially the second time around, those relationships are really amplified among the characters in the script. It’s really great. It’s such an ensemble show; I don’t think there’s a small part in that. Everybody’s so integral to the community, and they all form it.

So what effect do you feel like doing it again and again over a long period of time has on the show and the way it comes out?

Gosh, I feel like it’s such a wordy show! You know? It’s not a normal musical where everything is very legato; everything’s very staccato and very fast, so I think doing it a second time and getting out of your head word-wise- our Usnavi, Diego, he’s done this show I think 3 times now, and you can see his finesse on stage. That’s the perfect word for it. His cleanliness, and finesse in the performance because he just is Usnavi at this point and doesn’t have to think about his lines. He gets to just kind of observe the world around him, which is what every actor wants to do, to go on stage and not think about what we’re doing, only observe what everyone else is giving us, and I think that’s the really cool gift of getting to do something like this a second time around.

How is the process going to be different for the concert version?

Gosh, you know, for concert versions I think always energy is the number one word, and of course you have less time to make everything really clean. Ann-Carol Pence, our wonderful leader in music she makes the show, so I know she’s going to stress our cut-offs being extremely clean because anytime you’re in a field- this sounds really nerdy- but there are no walls, there’s nothing for the sound to reverberate off of, so things can get very muddy. Everyone sounds like Ariana Grande, and you can’t understand where one word starts and the other finishes.

So diction is really important when you’re outside and making things entertaining when you’re far away in a field and not in a beautiful theatre. And then Aurora’s really nice, because you don’t get a bad seat the way it’s set up very close. There is premium seating for this event, for those who want to get closer, but I know energy is going to be a huge thing. We’re still going to do the lines, I’m sure the dances will be a little bit smaller, and stuff like that, but essentially, it’s going to be the essence of the same show. It’ll be nice to do it concert-style so we get to concentrate on the words.

It sounds like the perfect show for a concert since it’s so dense!

[IN THE HEIGHTS writer Lin-Manuel Miranda] is so presentational anyhow as a human being, and this show is his baby, so it really shows the best parts of his personality, so I think just being at a mic and just singing the show is great. Usnavi has so many funny lines, it’s just going to be really great to play those straight out to the audience.

As far as “making things entertaining from far away” like you mentioned earlier, how will you personally be doing that?

Yeah, gosh, for me, voice is so important. you can always make people watch you if you’re saying the right thing with the right intention. My hair always helps! [laughs] I’m a head-bobber. But for this is going to be all about positioning and taking equity of the stage. I think we’re on the festival’s center stage, so we’ve been on this space for a small concert before, so it will be about highlighting the people who are on stage up front. Just really using all those theatre tools we learned in college! It’s crazy, the more professional I get, the more I’m like, “Oh yeah, I should be warming up every day like my college teacher told me.” Because it really does make a difference in your work.

So what are you most looking forward to about this version?

Gosh, I guess seeing everybody again! It sounds really lame, but this is one of the most special shows to me. Everyone from our dance captain to our ensemble, they were working non-stop in rehearsal. Even when people weren’t using them, they were working backstage cleaning stuff. I’ve just never seen a process where people, no matter far the show was, they always wanted the show to be better during rehearsal and during the run. So I know that when we get together this time again, everyone’s just going to be more clean and it’s just going to be a sharper, better show.

It’s a cool opportunity for the patrons who missed it last year, because I know a lot of people missed it because we had so many nights sold out. I’m really excited to get the cast together again now that we’ve all had a year of other shows and a year to just grow and stretch our muscles. To get to do this one again will be so much easier for us.

So particularly with your character, what are you looking forward to most about stepping back into that?

Our director, Justin Anderson, I hadn’t worked with him before, but I had known him in the theatre community for a long time, and I knew he always asks a lot of his actors. So my particular task for IN THE HEIGHTS was to be more grounded. I’m very happy as a human being; joy is not hard for me to display on stage, but stability and strength while being vulnerable and not completely falling into a puddle is very hard for me because I have the inclination to want to lean towards extreme emotion.

Vanessa doesn’t really show very much emotion. That’s her face guard, how she protects herself. So I got a lot of, “That’s great, but less.” So I’m really excited to get to try that again, because I feel like as we age, we always experience different things in life, and I feel like this year, I have kind of hardened a lot, and not in a bad way, but just that I know how to deal with people and I’m not emotional all the time. So I’m really excited to visit the character now that I’ve grown, and the things that were a challenge to me before, I’m excited to tackle them now instead of being overwhelmed by them like I was the first time.

That’s so great to get a chance to revisit and see how you’ve grown and how you can apply that!

Yeah, because by the end of the run, I really felt like I got it, but I really wished that I’d had it from the beginning. So I’m excited to be able to do it for one night and just hit it right from the top. And the show is really fun! It’s not a show where afterwards you’re like, “Ugh I’m just going to go home and cry!” It’s a joy to do!

Aurora continues their Musicals by Moonlight series with IN THE HEIGHTS tonight, June 17, at the Duluth Town Green at 8pm. Aurora says, “Free to the public and part of Duluth Art Week, the show will be held on the Festival Center stage. Bring the whole family and a picnic dinner (cooler with drinks perfectly acceptable) to enjoy during the show. Lawn seating begins at 5:00pm for the 8:00pm performance. Beer and wine also available for purchase.” Click here for more information!

It’s Too Darn Hot, so Check out Atlanta’s Top 5 Must-See Shows this Summer!

dancing handkerchief at theatrical outfit

Summer in the South can be downright miserable without proper distraction from the heat.

Fortunately for us, the Atlanta theatre family is offering ample distractions in the forms of some rockin’ shows all summer long! From parks to beloved local venues, ITP to OTP, this season in Atlanta has us counting ourselves lucky to be southerners. Now that all of our interstates are back in place (BLESS), let’s celebrate by venturing all around the city and laughing as we sail through.

beauty and the beast lyric

Beauty and the Beast at the Atlanta Lyric Theatre

When: June 9-25
Elevator pitch: I mean first of all, it’s one of the best Disney musicals ever. As for the timing, God bless the Lyric for capitalizing on the recent release of the Emma Watson movie. I give them 5 stars and a cookie for this decision. But better than the movie, this version will include the songs written for the Broadway show, including my personal favs, “If I Can’t Love Her,” and “If I Can’t Love Her (reprise).” (although, tbh I could go my whole life without hearing “Human Again” again)
But really, why fight Atlanta traffic? But to get right down to the point, the big draw for me is seeing the hilarious Jeff McKerley work his antics as Lumiere. Y’all, I would watch this man read the phone book. Serious question: is that a thing?
Get those tickets!

dancing handkerchief 2

The Dancing Handkerchief at Theatrical Outfit

When: June 1-18
Elevator pitch: To close their 40th season, Theatrical Outfit is bringing us a brand new musical that has yet to see the light of day. According to TO, this world premiere “blends the emotional accessibility of Disney princesses with the odd-ball pop-rock sensibility of Sergeant Pepper or Ziggy Stardust and evokes the imagined lands of Narnia and Alice’s Wonderland.” Literally, what’s not to like?
But really, why fight Atlanta traffic? Get excited y’all, because the songs are written by the Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony Award-winning Robert Lopez, who brought us FROZEN, AVENUE Q, and THE BOOK OF MORMON! I, for one, will be on the edge of my seat waiting for the next Lopez earworm.
Get those tickets!

robin hood serenbe

Robin Hood at Serenbe Playhouse

When: June 2-August 13
Elevator pitch: When’s the last time you remember hearing about a stage production of ROBIN HOOD? (Your nephew’s middle school play doesn’t count) The oh so familiar story of the good guy running through the woods, robbing the rich to feed the poor, and romancing a fair maiden in the process is perfect subject material for this creatively outdoor theatre.
But really, why fight Atlanta traffic? It’s no secret that this spring’s fabulous production of GREASE made me promise myself I’d never miss another Serenbe show (see: 10 Reasons You Can’t Miss GREASE at Serenbe). I’m excited to see a refreshingly fun, family-friendly adventure story. And how often do you get to see a woodsy play actually take place in nature?
Get those tickets!

memphis aurora

Memphis (AGAIN!) from Aurora

When: May 20 on the Suwanee Town Square
Elevator pitch: If you hate FREE Tony Award-winning musicals with infectious music and uncontrollably awesome dancing, skip this one. But if you’re human, the millionth reincarnation of Aurora Theatre/Theatrical Outfit’s MEMPHIS will kick off your Atlanta summer with just the right combination of excitement and inspiration.
But really, why fight Atlanta traffic? I fell in love with MEMPHIS when I saw the original Broadway cast and first tour, and I can tell you Aurora’s production was just as good. With dynamite vocals and endless, lovable energy, Travis Smith’s Huey Calhoun is not to be missed.
Get those tickets!

nobody loves you horizon

Nobody Loves You from Horizon Theatre

When/Where: June 14-17 at Piedmont Park
Elevator pitch: Can we just agree that it’s a crime to not go see a FREE musical? Ok perfect. Now that’s out of the way… Horizon has been the real MVP of the Atlanta theatre scene for the last few years as they have brought back crowd favorites- usually starring local stud Nick Arapoglou, if we’re being honest- for free encore performances in a popular Atlanta hangout spot.
But really, why fight Atlanta traffic? As a general rule, I’d pay to see Leslie Bellair work her comedic magic any day of the week (see: her single-handed portrayal of a two-character fight in TOXIC AVENGER). If it’s free, that’s what you’d call a no-brainer.
Get those tickets!

in the heights aurora

BONUS: In the Heights from Aurora Theatre

When/Where: June 17 at the Duluth Town Green
Elevator pitch: Free shows on free shows, y’all! Honestly, this is an easy one. Before there was HAMILTON (the musical, not the historical figure), almost-EGOT-er Lin-Manuel Miranda penned a semi-autobiographical musical called IN THE HEIGHTS. This encore performance of Aurora/Theatrical Outfit’s non-stop Dominican party about the importance of family and identity closes out the Lawrenceville company’s FREE Musicals by Moonlight series with a bang.
But really, why fight Atlanta traffic? Opening Aurora’s new season late last summer, IN THE HEIGHTS perfectly combines musical theatre rap- which is apparently a thing now- with endearing characters and a heartfelt message. But let’s be real, the endlessly talented Julissa Sabino as Vanessa makes attending this show a moral imperative.
Get those tickets!

Hit me up on Twitter (@BwayGinger) and tell me which shows you’re hype for this summer! 

NATIVE SON is Non-Stop at Marietta’s New Theatre in the Square

native son 1A hazy stage, so smoke-filled one can hardly see through it. Just before the play begins, it clears to reveal two platforms and chain-link fences in the background. An African-American man enters frantically with clothes in hand, pulling on his pants and shirt as he addresses the audience. Other characters vocally supply eerie sound-effects on their gradual entrances. Thus begins NATIVE SON at Marietta’s New Theatre in the Square. Its fragmented nature throws the audience into the middle of the story, a perfect prelude to a frantically-structured narrative.

Bigger- yes that’s his name- chauffeurs for a white family, but when he brings home the oldest daughter Mary (Shay Alexi) very drunk and tries to keep her silent as her blind mother hears them arrive late at night, he accidentally smothers the girl to death. And no, that’s not a spoiler, as this all transpires in the first ten minutes.

The play follows the story of Bigger (Dee Jordan) almost entirely non-sequentially, as the audience sees his choices interrupted by the voice in his head, another character altogether (known as “Black Rat,” which you’d only know with a labeled production shot in hand). Black Rat (Rahshaun Cormier) functions at first as the voice of reason- or foolishness- but as the play progresses, both he and the real Bigger alternately live Bigger’s life. One moment, Bigger is speaking to the private investigator, the next it’s his alter-ego doing the interacting as Bigger supplies the voice.

native son 2The experience is exhausting in the best way. The jumpy, though not impossible to follow, style mirrors Bigger’s perpetually conflicted mental state. As such, this allows the audience to ride along with him and truly sympathize with his plight. Under the powerful direction of Emil Thomas, the piece exemplifies how a theatrical style alone can convey the emotions of the central character. From the moment it starts, we’re all in and without an intermission, don’t get a reprieve until the very end.

With no microphones in sight, a bare bones set, and few- if any- recorded sound effects, this unplugged atmosphere refreshingly emphasizes Nambi E. Kelley’s rich text, allowing it alone to tell the story. This script choice suits the Emil Theatre’s small space well, and the subject matter rings relevant in a time when race relations continue to dominate social media discussions. Its fast pace is accentuated by an equally fast-paced and poignant lighting design by Stephen Reilly, to whom I’d give star billing.  Why do Bigger and Black Rat strip down in the final sequence? I couldn’t tell ya. I also couldn’t tell ya what those last few lines were.

Follow @BwayGinger for more Atlanta theatre news, reviews, and snarky opinions. And then let’s be best friends and talk about how much we love Aaron Tveit.

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10 Reasons You Can’t Miss GREASE at Serenbe Playhouse

25Full disclosure: GREASE is not my favorite musical. As a rule, it’s one of those movies reserved only for girls’ nights every few years or some other context in which there are enough distractions involved that we can all forget it has no plot. But y’all. Serenbe Playhouse’s production has completely changed that image for me. Set outdoors on a T-shaped stage in a wide open field, this interpretation is the best I’ve ever experienced. And here’s why.

  1. That opener though.
    1It begins at the Rydell High School graduation with Miss Lynch, Patty Simcox, and Eugene Florczyk remarking on the classy behaviors these supposedly Wally Cleaver-type teens exhibited during their time at this learning institution. Their rose-colored speech is interrupted by the first chords of the title song as dancers slide in and Rizzo (a powerful Julissa Sabino) takes the stage, mic in hand, to own “Grease is the Word.” I think my exact whispered words to my companion, after dropping my jaw, were “Oh I was NOT ready for that!”
  2. Summer Nights. Need I say more?
    As the intro to possibly the most popular song from the movie started, I could see the whole audience very visibly adjust their posture in anticipation. The whole song can best be described as completely satisfying. With the Pink Ladies on one set of rolling mini-bleachers and T-Birds on another, choreographer Bubba Carr incorporated a wonderful mix of “standard” sequences we’re all expecting to see from this song specifically, while building on them to bring a fresh look to the beloved piece.
  3. Triple threats on triple threats.
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    Since Serenbe uses the Broadway version- as opposed to the movie we’re familiar with- significant portions of the narrative in this adaptation look different from what some may be expecting. But only in good ways. Serenbe’s production is primarily ensemble-based, contrasting to the movie which shifts the focus to heavily showcase stars like John Travolta. This company-led musical demands that every single one of the core of about ten characters not only sings as the featured singer in a solo/duet (which, I might add were a delightful addition!), but every lead performer flaunts top-notch dance abilities as well. Not to mention the ensemble who we’ve come to assume at this point is made up of brilliant dancers. To answer the question all nerds are asking, yes, Keneckie sings “Greased Lightning” instead of Danny.
  4. Atlanta celebs.
    Thrown in for cameos, local Atlanta radio personalities appeared in the show as well. Cindy Simmons (former co-host of Star 94’s morning show for a hundred years or so), along with her mother and husband, was featured as one of the stars of the drive-in movie that Danny and Sandy attend, and “new guy Brian” from Q100’s Bert Show slips in there as the Teen Angel at some performances.
  5. Rizzo. RIZZO, Y’ALL.
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    There aren’t enough words to express how much you must see Julissa Sabino as Betty Rizzo. She was adorable as Vanessa in IN THE HEIGHTS at Aurora last year, and as Rydell High’s resident bad girl, she takes her skills to the next level. Oozing with that appealing rebellious nature you’d expect of Rizzo, Sabino also brings out the heart of the character, reminding the audience this bad-ass is really just a teenager at the end of the day.
  6. It works in ways the movie didn’t.
    Remember how in the movie the characters are one-dimensional at best with barely any development? This adaptation fixes those problems significantly. Patty Simcox has a thing for Danny, which Danny takes advantage of to make Sandy jealous. ChaCha doesn’t own the dance floor at all, but actually makes a fool of herself at the prom. As for the rest of the T-Birds and Pink Ladies, their aforementioned solos/duets show these Rydell cliques are made of real people rather than space-fillers. Oh and they don’t even try to have that car race that was so epically lame in Fox’s GREASE LIVE that even Aaron Tveit’s lovely face couldn’t redeem those awkward five minutes.
  7. Sandy doesn’t change for a guy.
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    The clencher, the most significant element that makes this show a refreshing change from the movie is the way Sandy and Rizzo’s characters overlap. Rizzo sings “There are Worse Things I Could Do” to Sandy after discovering Rizzo is pregnant. In a move that ultimately transforms Sandy’s character, the song placement makes it about Rizzo directly telling Sandy that while she realizes she’s “the bad girl,” at least she has life experience and depth, unlike the squeaky clean blondie. “Sandra Dee (reprise)” powerfully follows right after Rizzo’s exit. With this in mind, Sandy doesn’t change her wardrobe and demeanor because she wants Danny to like her again; she changes because, boys aside, she wants to take chances and experience the world. She wants to be fearless. She wants to have depth. She wants to be Rizzo.
  8. India Tyree.
    With a recent featured appearance in Aurora’s premiere of SWEEP, I’d add India to the list of Atlanta actors to see in 2017. As Jan, the Pink Lady in pigtails, her charisma overflows in the adorable delivery of every line, and the precision in her characterization makes her a joy to watch.
  9. The lovely men.
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    As much as I’d love to stick to serious, professional-sounding critiques, the reality is you just can’t talk about GREASE at Serenbe Playhouse without mentioning how attractive all the guys are. Michael Stiggers Jr. does not disappoint as Danny. Jeremiah Parker Hobbes’ swag is out of this world as Keneckie. Honestly, the men are all straight-up eye candy. Thanks, Serenbe fam.
  10. It shows us vast possibilities of where theatre can go.
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    Is it still an incomplete story with large plot holes and a leading lady that has no character? Absolutely. But it’s the most delightful two or so hours you could spend in this lovely spring weather. The execution of the music is spot-on. The dancing is nostalgic as well as inventive. The set takes advantage of modern technology through the use of a backdrop screen. The whole show utilizes an immersive drive-in movie motif from the moment you step onto the property. It’s one of those refreshing shows that brings something new to the table and reminds us why live theatre is an art form. It reminds us how a Broadway musical can be expanded into something new and exciting.

GREASE runs through April 16 at Wild Flower Meadow at Serenbe Playhouse. Click here for more information and tickets!

Photo credits: BreeAnne Clowdus